Advayavada Study Plan – week 11

[week 11] In week 10 we implemented our improved way of doing things (fifth step on the Noble Eightfold Path), and, to continue with this quarter’s 13-week Advayavada Study Plan, in week 11 we shall concentrate on mustering our very best effort and commitment to fulfil our improved objective. This task is based on the sixth step on the Noble Eightfold Path: samma-vayama (in Pali) or samyag-vyayama (in Sanskrit); in Advayavada Buddhism’s personalized usage: our very best effort and commitment; in Dutch: onze beste inspanning (de zesde stap op het edele achtvoudige pad). Importantly, as we advance properly along the Buddha’s Middle Way responding to his promise of Nirvana, we shall be ridding ourselves of the so-called ten fetters (dasa-samyojana) that restrict us to samsaric life: 1) belief in the self, 2) scepticism regarding the Path, 3) attachment to rituals, 4) partiality for certain things, 5) prejudice against certain things, 6) clinging to physical life, 7) hope of a hereafter, 8) conceit and pride, 9) intolerance and irritability, and 10) the last remnants of our ignorance. (from advayavada.org/#plan)

Advayavada Study Plan – week 37

Dear friends,

The purpose of Advayavada Buddhism is to become a true part of the whole.

In Advayavada Buddhism, the Path is understood as an ongoing and fully autonomous, non-prescriptive, investigative and creative process of progressive insight, reflecting in human terms wondrous overall existence becoming over time in its manifest direction. When followed conscientiously, it becomes nothing less than the main karmic factor in one’s share in the universal interdependent origination process (madhyamaka-pratityasamutpada). It is composed stepwise of (1) our very best (samma in Pali and samyak in Sanskrit) comprehension or insight, followed by (2) our very best resolution or determination, (3) our very best enunciation or definition (of our intention), (4) our very best disposition or attitude, (5) our very best implementation or realization, (6) our very best effort or commitment, (7) our very best observation, reflection or evaluation and self-correction, and (8) our very best meditation or concentration towards an increasingly real experience of oneness with the universe, which brings us to (1) a yet better comprehension or insight, and so forth.

The Advayavada Study Plan (ASP) is repeated four times a year. In weeks 27 to 31 we treated the preliminary subjects, in week 32 we honestly reviewed and took stock of our personal situation (first step), in week 33 we took an appropriate and timely decision to adjust our course (second step), in week 34 we put our decision and purpose in writing (third step), in week 35 we further developed our very best attitude (fourth step), in week 36 we implemented our improved modus operandi (fifth step), and, to continue with the current third quarter, in week 37 we shall concentrate on mustering our very best effort and commitment to fulfil our improved objective.

This task is based on the sixth step on the Noble Eightfold Path: samma-vayama (in Pali) or samyag-vyayama (in Sanskrit); in Advayavada Buddhism’s usage: our very best effort and commitment; in Dutch: onze beste inspanning (de zesde stap op het edele achtvoudige pad).

Importantly, as we advance properly along the Buddha’s Middle Way responding to his promise of Nirvana, we shall rid ourselves of the so-called ten fetters (dasa-samyojana) that restrict us to samsaric life: 1) belief in the self, 2) scepticism regarding the Path, 3) attachment to rituals, 4) partiality for certain things, 5) prejudice against certain things, 6) clinging to physical life, 7) hope of a hereafter, 8) conceit and pride, 9) intolerance and irritability, and 10) the last remnants of our fundamental ignorance (avidya, avijja).

Kind regards,
John Willemsens,
Advayavada Foundation.
advayavada.org/#plan

Advayavada Study Plan – week 24

Dear friends,

The purpose of Advayavada Buddhism is to become a true part of the whole.

Our quest is fully personalized: it is firmly based on what we increasingly know about ourselves and our world, and trusting our own intentions, feelings and conscience. Adherence to the familiar five precepts (not to kill, not to steal, sexual restraint, not to lie, and refraining from alcohol and drugs) and a well-considered understanding of the three (in Advayavada Buddhism, four) signs of being and the Buddha’s four noble truths (which were, this quarter, the subjects of weeks 14 to 18) suffice to start off on this Path at any time.

Advayavada Buddhism does not tell you what to do or believe, but invites us all to make the very best of our own lives by indeed attuning as best as possible with wondrous overall existence advancing over time now in its manifest direction. The Advayavada Study Plan (ASP) is repeated four times a year.

The purpose of the autonomous ASP is that we study (and debate in a local group, the family circle or with good friends) the meaning and implications of the weekly subject, not as a formal and impersonal intellectual exercise, but in the context of whatever we ourselves are presently doing or are concerned with, or about, such as our health, relationships, work, study, our place in society, etc.

My own specific personal objective this quarter is to improve my understanding of the practice of meditation (dhyana in Sanskrit, jhana in Pali) whose purpose is to attain a deeper concentration of the mind (Samadhi in Sanskrit and Pali), but without becoming preoccupied, however, with a factually non-existent self (svabhava-shunyata, lit. self-nature emptiness, is a central notion in Madhyamaka philosophy) – what’s your specific objective this quarter?

In week 14 we observed and studied the impermanence or changeability of all things, in week 15 we studied the selflessness and finitude of all things, in week 16 we observed the ubiquity of existential suffering in the world, in week 17 we continued to deepen our understanding that ignorant craving and attachment are the immediate causes of existential suffering, and in week 18 we surveyed the Noble Eightfold Path that eliminates the immediate causes of existential suffering, thus concluding the preliminary subjects.

In week 19 we honestly reviewed and took stock of our personal situation (first step), in week 20 we took an appropriate and timely decision to adjust our course (second step), in week 21 we again put our decision and objective in writing (third step), in week 22 we further developed our very best attitude to carry out our improved objective (fourth step), in week 23 we implemented our improved way of doing things (fifth step), and, to continue this 13-week action plan, in week 24 we shall concentrate on mustering our very best effort and commitment to fulfil our improved objective.

This task is based on the sixth step on the Noble Eightfold Path: samma-vayama (in Pali) or samyag-vyayama (in Sanskrit); in Advayavada Buddhism’s usage: our very best effort and commitment; in Dutch: onze beste inspanning (de zesde stap op het edele achtvoudige pad). And importantly, as we advance properly along the Buddha’s Middle Way responding to his promise of Nirvana, we shall rid ourselves of the so-called ten fetters (dasa-samyojana) that restrict us to samsaric life: 1) belief in the self, 2) scepticism regarding the Path, 3) attachment to rituals, 4) partiality for certain things, 5) prejudice against certain things, 6) clinging to physical life, 7) hope of a hereafter, 8) conceit and pride, 9) intolerance and irritability, and 10) the last remnants of our ignorance.

Other translations of the sixth step are: right thought (Arnold), right effort (Bodhi, Burt, Ch’en, Conze, David-Neel, Dhammananda, Eliot, Fernando, Gethin, Grimm, Harvey, Humphreys, Keown, Khemo, Kornfield, Malalasekera, Narada, Narasu, Nyanatiloka, Rahula, Rhys Davids, Saddhatissa, St Ruth, Stroup, Thich Nhat Hanh), appropriate effort (Batchelor), right exertion (Dharmapala, Guenther), right endeavour (Bahm, Dharmapala, Horner, Takakusu), right application (Watts); proper effort in the proper direction (Edwardes); correct exertion (Kloppenborg), right striving (Melamed), correct striving (Scheepers), right exercise (Warder).

Nirvana is, in Advayavada Buddhism, the total extinction of our existential suffering as a result of our complete reconciliation and harmonization with reality as it truly is beyond our commonly limited and biased personal experience of it; the unremitting persistency of human distress, alienation and conflict is undeniably due to the very many not knowing or not understanding or simply disbelieving the true nature of existence.

Feel free to share these ASP instalments.

Kind regards,
John Willemsens,
Advayavada Foundation.
@advayavada

Advayavada Study Plan – week 11

Dear friends,

The purpose of Advayavada Buddhism is to become a true part of the whole.

Our quest is fully personalized: it is firmly based on what we increasingly know about ourselves and our world, and trusting our own intentions, feelings and conscience. Adherence to the familiar five precepts (not to kill, not to steal, sexual restraint, not to lie, and refraining from alcohol and drugs) and a well-considered understanding of the three (in Advayavada Buddhism, four) signs of being and the Buddha’s four noble truths, which were the subjects of weeks 1 to 5, suffice to start off on this Path at any time.

Advayavada Buddhism does not tell you what to do or believe, but invites us all to make the very best of our own lives by indeed attuning as best as possible with wondrous overall existence advancing over time now in its manifest direction. The Advayavada Study Plan (ASP) is repeated four times a year.

The purpose of the autonomous ASP is that we study (and debate in a local group, the family circle or with good friends) the meaning and implications of the weekly subject, not as a formal and impersonal intellectual exercise, but in the context of whatever we ourselves are presently doing or are concerned with, or about, such as our health, relationships, work, study, our place in society, etc.

(My own specific personal objective this quarter is to observe and interpret as closely as possible the workings in my own life of pratityasamutpada, i.e. the process of universal relativity or interdependent origination, understood as in Madhyamaka, where ‘all causes are effects and all effects are causes’, and karma, understood as the everchanging knotlet of biopsychosocial events in which I am personally embedded – what’s yours?)

In week 6 we reviewed and took stock of our personal situation and circumstances, in week 7 we took an appropriate and timely decision to adjust our course, in week 8 we put our decision and objective in writing as precisely as possible, in week 9 we further developed our very best attitude to carry out our improved personal objective, in week 10 we implemented our improved way of doing things as best as possible and, to continue our current 13-week plan of action, in week 11 we shall concentrate on mustering our very best effort and commitment to fulfil our improved objective.

This task is based on the 6th step on the Noble Eightfold Path: samma-vayama (in Pali) or samyag-vyayama (in Sanskrit); in Advayavada Buddhism’s usage: our very best effort and commitment; in Dutch: onze beste inspanning (de zesde stap op het edele achtvoudige pad). And importantly, as we advance properly along the Buddha’s Middle Way responding to his promise of Nirvana, we shall rid ourselves of the so-called ten fetters (dasa-samyojana) that restrict us to samsaric life: 1) belief in the self, 2) scepticism regarding the Path, 3) attachment to rituals, 4) partiality for certain things, 5) prejudice against certain things, 6) clinging to physical life, 7) hope of a hereafter, 8) conceit and pride, 9) intolerance and irritability, and 10) the last remnants of our ignorance.

Nirvana is, in Advayavada Buddhism, the total extinction of our existential suffering as a result of our complete reconciliation and harmonization with reality as it truly is beyond our commonly limited and biased personal experience of it; the unremitting persistency of human distress, alienation and conflict is essentially due to the very many not knowing or not understanding or simply disbelieving the true nature of existence.

Other translations of the 6th step are: right thought (Arnold), right effort (Bodhi, Burt, Ch’en, Conze, David-Neel, Dhammananda, Eliot, Fernando, Gethin, Grimm, Harvey, Humphreys, Keown, Khemo, Kornfield, Malalasekera, Narada, Narasu, Nyanatiloka, Rahula, Rhys Davids, Saddhatissa, St Ruth, Stroup), appropriate effort (Batchelor), right exertion (Dharmapala, Guenther), right endeavour (Bahm, Dharmapala, Horner, Takakusu), right application (Watts); proper effort in the proper direction (Edwardes); correct exertion (Kloppenborg), right striving (Melamed), correct striving (Scheepers), right exercise (Warder).

Kind regards,
John Willemsens,
Advayavada Foundation.
@advayavada

Wat is geluk?

Laat ik [John Willemsens] vooropstellen dat ik het tamelijk wrang vind om over geluk te spreken met alles wat er mis is met de mensheid.

Het abstracte, zelfstandig naamwoord ‘geluk’ heeft verschillende aan elkaar verwante betekenissen. De Van Dale noemt als voornaamste de volgende vier:
Als eerste, geluk in de betekenis van fortuin, in de zin van een gunstige loop der omstandigheden, de voorspoed die iemand zonder eigen toedoen te beurt valt;
ten tweede, geluk als de aangename toestand waarin men al zijn, tussen haakjes, aardse, wensen en verlangens bevredigd ziet;
ten derde, geluk als het gunstig toeval, een begunstigende omstandigheid of voorval, een blijde gebeurtenis;
en als laatste, geluk als het behaaglijk gevoel van degene die al zijn, en opnieuw tussen haakjes, aardse, wensen bevredigd ziet en zich verheugt over de hem ten deel gevallen zegen, de toestand van vervuldheid.

Spinoza is bijvoorbeeld erg scherp in zijn oordeel over wat de mens als goed of gunstig en als kwaad of ongunstig ervaart. In zijn commentaar op stelling 39 van deel 3 van de Ethica, het deel over ‘de oorsprong en de aard van de hartstochten (of affecten)’, stelt hij o.a. het volgende:

“Onder goed [of gunstig] versta ik hier elk soort blijdschap en verder al wat daartoe leidt, in het bijzonder al datgene dat een verlangen van welke aard dan ook bevredigt. Onder kwaad [of ongunstig] versta ik elk soort droefheid en vooral datgene dat een verlangen onbevredigd laat. Hiervóór hebben we aangetoond [stelt hij verder], dat wij niet iets begeren omdat wij het als goed beoordelen, maar omgekeerd iets goed noemen omdat wij het begeren [!] Wij noemen dus ook iets waarvan wij een afkeer hebben een kwaad. Iedereen oordeelt of bepaalt daarom op grond van zijn eigen hartstocht wat goed of kwaad, beter of slechter en uiteindelijk wat het beste of het slechtste is. Een vrek bijvoorbeeld meent dat een groot vermogen het beste en geldgebrek het slechtste is. Een eerzuchtig mens verlangt niets zozeer als roem en er is niets dat hij meer vreest dan schande. Voor een jaloers iemand is niets aangenamer dan het ongeluk van een ander en niets vervelender dan zijn geluk…..” (einde citaat)

Spinoza maakt in al zijn werk een heel duidelijk onderscheid tussen dit alledaags geluk (felicitas) en de gelukzaligheid (beatitudo). In hoofdstukje 4 van het aanhangsel van deel 4 van de Ethica, het deel over ‘de menselijke slavernij ofwel de krachten van de hartstochten’, staat bijvoorbeeld het volgende:

“In dit leven heeft de vervolmaking van het verstand ofwel de rede dus het grootst mogelijke nut. Slechts hierin bestaat het grootste geluk of gelukzaligheid van de mens, want gelukzaligheid is hetzelfde als de gemoedsrust die uit de intuïtieve kennis van God [ofwel de Natuur] ontstaat. Welnu het vervolmaken van het verstand is hetzelfde als het kennen van God, zijn attributen en de handelingen, die uit zijn natuur noodzakelijk voortvloeien. Het uiteindelijke doel van de mens die door de rede geleid wordt, dat wil zeggen, zijn voornaamste begeerte, waarmee hij al de andere tracht te matigen, is daarom de begeerte die erop gericht is zichzelf en al de andere dingen die zijn verstand kan bevatten, adequaat te kennen.” (einde citaat)

In een van zijn eerste boeken, The Meaning of Happiness, uit 1940, schrijft Alan Watts (een andere favoriet van mij) het volgende:

“Wanneer de mens zijn ware zelf vindt, zal hij begrijpen dat door te vluchten voor de dood, de angst en het verdriet hij van zichzelf een slaaf heeft gemaakt. Hij zal de geheimzinnige waarheid ontdekken dat hij in feite vrij is om beide te leven en te sterven, te beminnen en te vrezen, om blij en verdrietig te zijn, en dat er geen schande schuilt in niets van dit alles. Maar de mens weigert die vrijheid, denkend dat de dood, de angst en het verdriet de redenen zijn voor zijn ongelukkig zijn. De werkelijke reden voor zijn ongelukkig zijn is dat hij zichzelf niet vrij maakt om ze te accepteren, omdat hij niet begrijpt dat wie vrij is om lief te hebben niet werkelijk vrij is tenzij hij ook vrij is om te vrezen, dat dit de vrijheid van de gelukzaligheid is.” (einde citaat)

Het woord voor gelukzaligheid in het Sanskriet is Ananda. Het was en is een belangrijk begrip in India en Ananda was een van de voornaamste vertrouwelingen van de historische Boeddha. Mijn eigen boeddhistische naam A-dvaya-vada-nanda, is een combinatie van Advayavada, de enkelvoudigheidsleer, en Ananda, de gelukzaligheid of blijdschap die mij die leer brengt. De aanhanger van het Advayavada-boeddhisme heeft de overtuiging dat de mens als vooruitgang ervaart wat overeenkomt met de richting waarin het geheel van het bestaan voortgaat in de tijd en dat daarom het Edele Achtvoudige Pad een weerspiegeling in menselijke termen is van die vooruitgang van het bestaan.

Door zijn gemoedsrust en blije gevoelens ervaart de Advayavadin in zijn volgen van het Pad heel duidelijk de algemene vooruitgang, de alles omvattende trek naar beter toe, van het bestaan. Hij vindt in zijn persoonlijk volgen van het Pad het onweerlegbaar bewijs van die vooruitgang van het geheel. In het Advayavada-boeddhisme wordt deze vooruitgang danook als het vierde kenmerk van het bestaan beschouwd, naast de veranderlijkheid en de vergankelijkheid van alle individuele dingen en het existentieel lijden van degenen die deze feiten niet onderkennen en accepteren.

Het Achtvoudige Pad voert ons uiteindelijk tot Nirvana. In het Advayavada-boeddhisme is dit Nirvana gelijk aan de gelukzaligheid van een volmaakte aansluiting, tijdens ons eigen leven van zo’n 4.000 weken, met de werkelijkheid in zijn totaliteit en hierdoor de volledige opheffing van dat existentieel lijden. Wat houdt dat Achtvoudige Pad volgens het Advayavada-boeddhisme in?

Laat ik eerst even memoreren dat boeddhisme een verzamelnaam is voor de verschillende wijsgerige en religieuze denkbeelden die zijn afgeleid van de verlossingsleer die werd onderwezen, in de zesde eeuw voor Christus, door de Noord-Indiase prins Siddhartha Gautama, genaamd de Boeddha, wat Ontwaakte of Verlichte betekent.

Iemand zei eens dat de geschiedenis van het boeddhisme een lang verhaal van ketterijen was. In de vijfentwintig eeuwen sinds de Boeddha heeft zijn oorspronkelijke eenvoudige leer inderdaad vele veranderingen en aanpassingen ondergaan. En in die zin is het Advayavada-boeddhisme dat ik uitdraag ook in zekere zin een ketterij. Het Advayavada-boeddhisme kan worden beschouwd als een nieuwe loot aan de grote Mahayana tak van het boeddhisme.

Het Theravada boeddhisme van ZO Azië is beslist de oudste vorm. De ideale figuur in het Theravada boeddhisme is de arhat, die na dit leven niet wordt herboren. Dit is waar het orthodoxe Theravada boeddhisme naar streeft, het niet herboren te hoeven worden.

Het Mahayana boeddhisme is óók wel over het algemeen wereldvliedend, maar het fundamentele verschil met het Theravada boeddhisme ligt in het feit dat de ideale figuur in het Mahayana boeddhisme niet de arhat is, maar de bodhisattva, en dat dit verlicht wezen Nirvana beslist niet wil ingaan totdat hij of zij alle wezens op aarde heeft geholpen om hetzelfde te bereiken.

Het Mahayana boeddhisme begon echt vorm te krijgen in de eerste eeuwen van onze jaartelling, zo’n 7 à 8 eeuwen na de dood van de Boeddha. De twee grote namen zijn Nagarjoena, de stichter van de Madhyamaka richting, en Asanga de stichter van de Yogachara ofwel Vijñanavada richting. De grote verdienste van Nagarjoena is zijn ordening en uitdieping van de uitgebreide leringen van de Prajñaparamita Soetras. De Diamant Soetra en de vaak gereciteerde en gezongen Hart Soetra, die vooral uitlegt dat vorm en leegte hetzelfde zijn, zijn er een onderdeel van. Er staan fraai gezongen versies van de Heart Sutra in alle talen op YouTube.

Kernbegrippen in de Yogachara zijn dat wij als mens indrukken die wij ondergaan als zaden verzamelen in een soort voorraad- of bewaarbewustzijn waar ze combineren en tot voorstellingen uitgroeien, dat alle dingen inclusief wijzelf derhalve enkel voorstellingen van ons denken zijn, en dat dus ook ons ik of ego een illusie is. Uit het Yogachara idealisme is o.a. het Amidisme ontstaan dat wij vooral in China en Japan aantreffen. De Boeddha Amida met hart en ziel aanroepen is voldoende om na de dood in het Zuivere Land, Pure Land, te geraken.

Het Tibetaans boeddhisme ontstond hoog in Noordwest-India als een samensmelting van boeddhistische beginselen en kloosterregels en oude Indiase geloven, yoga, allerlei tantrische teksten, de herhaling van mantras, enz. en later veel van de lokale Bon religie. Er onstonden vanaf de 8e eeuw vier belangrijke stromingen, waarvan de laatste, de Gelugpa (de ‘gelekap’ school der deugdzamen) in de 14e eeuw, die grotendeels is gebaseerd op Nagarjoena’s Madhyamaka. De charismatische 14e Dalai Lama, die in 1959 moest vluchten naar India, is het huidige spirituele hoofd van de Gelugpas.

De belangrijkste kernbegrippen in de Madhyamaka, wat leer van het midden betekent, zijn het samengestelde ontstaan en onderlinge afhankelijkheid van alle dingen en hun leegte, d.w.z. hun gebrek aan zelfheid. Dan hebben wij de twee waarheden die tot onze beschikking staan: de conventionele waarheid en de absolute of hogere waarheid, en dat Samsara (het dagelijks leven) en Nirvana (het verloste bestaan) in wezen identiek zijn. Invloeden van deze kernbegrippen zien wij ook terug in het sobere Chan (in het Japans Zen)-boeddhisme en ze vormen ook de basis van ons eigen nonduale, wereldminnende Advayavada-boeddhisme. A-dvaya-vada betekent zoiets als ‘niet-twee-leer’. Dat dit het is. This is It. Dat dit-hier alles is. Dat het Achtvoudige Pad, dat wij als vooruitgang ervaren, een afspiegeling is van deze ene werkelijkheid. En er is geen reïncarnatie of wedergeboorte in het Advayavada-boeddhisme.

Voor ons staat het vast dat de Boeddha niet in Brahman (God) of in de atman (ziel) geloofde en leerde dat de mens lijdt omdat hij de dingen niet ziet zoals ze in werkelijkheid zijn, d.w.z. veranderlijk en vergankelijk, en hierdoor zijn leven verkeerd inricht, aan de verkeerde dingen vasthoudt en de verkeerde dingen najaagt.

Die verkeerde zienswijze wordt veroorzaakt door een uit de onwetendheid van de mens voortkomende levensdorst, en deze levensdorst kan ongemerkt meer kwalijke vormen gaan aannemen: reeds als begeerte, nijd, gemakzucht, ongedurigheid of wantrouwen kan zij hem gaan beletten om zijn leven ten goede te keren.

De nakoming van de vijf leefregels, die van toepassing zijn op alle volgelingen van de Boeddha, zal hem daarentegen in staat stellen om die levensdorst te ondervangen en vervolgens de grondoorzaak van zijn lijden, d.w.z. zijn onwetendheid, te gaan opheffen. De vijf leefregels zijn niet te doden, niet te stelen, kuisheid, niet te bedriegen en zich onthouden van alcohol en drugs.

De naleving van deze leefregels verschaft hem de morele kracht om zich te kunnen begeven op de middenweg tussen in eerste instantie de extremen van genotzucht en zelfkwelling, die hem naar de gezegende staat van Nirvana zal voeren. Nirvana houdt in de opheffing van het lijden door ons te verzoenen met de werkelijkheid zoals zij feitelijk is voorbij onze beperkte en vooringenomen beleving van haar.

Nirvana en de waarneembare wereld zijn niet twee verschillende werkelijkheden of twee verschillende toestanden van de werkelijkheid. Nirvana is de waarneembare wereld te beleven specie aeternitatis d.w.z. vanuit het gezichtspunt der eeuwigheid. Het is, met andere woorden, de ene werkelijkheid ontdaan van al onze denkbeelden, met inbegrip uiteindelijk zelfs van deze.

De middenweg die men dient te volgen is in concreto het Edele Achtvoudige Pad dat de Boeddha reeds leerde in zijn allereerste preek te Benares. In het Advayavada-boeddhisme houdt het in het doorlopend streven, met inachtneming van de vijf leefregels, naar achtereenvolgens ons beste inzicht, ons beste besluit, onze beste formulering of uitleg, onze beste instelling, beste uitvoering, beste inspanning, beste aandacht en onze beste bezinning, wat ons tot een nog adequater inzicht dient te voeren, en zo verder. Op deze manier sluiten wij aan bij de voortgang naar beter toe van het geheel en verbreken wij, al vorderend op het Pad, de boeien die ons aan Samsara ketenen. Onze volledige aansluiting geeft ons een gemoedsrust en gevoelens van geluk die goed vergelijkbaar zijn met die van Spinoza’s intuïtive kennis van God ofwel de Natuur.

De Tien Boeien die ons tot het niet-verlichte Samsara beperken, en die wij door het Pad te volgen achtereenvolgens breken, zijn het geloof in een afzonderlijke ik… de twijfel… de gehechtheid aan rituelen… de ingenomenheid met… en tegen bepaalde dingen… de hang naar het aards bestaan… en de zucht naar een hiernamaals… de zelfgenoegzaamheid… en de onverdraagzaamheid… en de laatste hardnekkige resten van onze fundamentele onwetendheid over de werkelijke aard van het bestaan.

Samenvattend, het Advayavada-boeddhisme is een nieuwe, wereldminnende vorm van het boeddhisme, zonder geloof in wedergeboorte of reïncarnatie, afgeleid van de Madhyamaka van Nagarjoena. Het stelt dat het Edele Achtvoudige Pad een afspiegeling is van de voortgang van het geheel van het bestaan. En, omdat wij het volgen van het Pad als vooruitgang ervaren, dat ook die voortgang van het geheel in menselijke termen vooruitgang inhoudt. Onze volledige aansluiting met de vooruitgang van het geheel is volgens het Advayavada-boeddhisme de hoogste gelukzaligheid, Nirvana.

De Indiase wijsgeer Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh, nu beter bekend als Osho, schreef mij in 1985 vanuit Oregon, zo’n vijf jaar voor zijn dood, het volgende:

“De waarheid waarover ik spreek is een gevoel van blijdschap in je hart. Het heeft niets de maken met logisch denken of wijsheid. Het heeft te maken met een transformatie van je meest innerlijke kern. Het is wanneer je wezen begint te bonzen en te kloppen in harmonie met het bestaan.. wanneer er geen dissonantie meer is tussen jou en het geheel.. wanneer je zo afgestemd bent op het geheel dat jij er niet meer bent, maar enkel het geheel er is.”

(einde citaat – einde lezing)

Dank u wel.

De Vijf Leefregels

De naleving van de vijf boeddhistische leefregels en een gedegen inzicht in de betekenis van de Boeddha’s Vier Edele Waarheden* stellen ons in staat het Edele Achtvoudige Pad* te betreden, het al vorderend op het Pad de Tien Boeien* die ons aan Samsara ketenen te verbreken, en uiteindelijk de gezegende staat van Nirvana* te bereiken.

De vijf leefregels behelzen volgens het Advayavada-boeddhisme het volgende:

1) het niet doden van mens of dier in de zin van deze niet te pijnigen en te verminken of zodanig anders moedwillig letsel aan te brengen dat de dood erop volgt of kan volgen.

2) het niet stelen of ons anders onrechtmatig toe-eigenen van gebied, goederen, geld of hand- of geestesarbeid, noch ons direct of indirect schuldig maken aan heling daarvan.

3) kuisheid in de zin van het niet verrichten van seksuele handelingen die als liefdeloos, overspelig, incestueus, gewelddadig of onnatuurlijk bestempeld zouden kunnen worden.

4) het niet bedriegen door middel van list of leugen beide in de zin van de onwaarheid te spreken als de waarheid te verhullen, ook en vooral in ons openbaar en zakelijk leven.

5) geheelonthouding – het in het geheel niet gebruiken van alcohol of andere al dan niet verslavende middelen die ons bewustzijn kunnen aantasten en/of anders onze gezondheid kunnen schaden.

* De Vier Edele Waarheden: de Eerste Waarheid is die van de alomtegenwoordigheid van het lijden in de wereld; de Tweede Waarheid is dat het lijden wordt veroorzaakt door de levensdorst; de Derde Waarheid is dat het lijden (dus) kan worden opgeheven door de levensdorst uit te bannen; de Vierde Waarheid is die van het Pad dat men daartoe dient te volgen, het Edele Achtvoudige Pad.

* Het Edele Achtvoudige Pad houdt volgens het Advayavada-boeddhisme in het doorlopend streven naar achtereenvolgens het beste (samyak, samma) inzicht, het beste besluit, de beste formulering, de beste instelling, de beste uitvoering, de beste inspanning, de beste aandacht, en de beste bezinning, wat ons tot een nog beter inzicht dient te voeren, en zo verder. Wij sluiten aldus aan bij de voortgang naar beter toe van het geheel. Het Advayavada-boeddhisme beschouwt de vooruitgang als het vierde kenmerk van het bestaan, naast de veranderlijkheid en de vergankelijkheid der dingen en de alomtegenwoordigheid van het lijden van het klassieke boeddhisme. Het Edele Achtvoudige Pad wordt gezien als een weerspiegeling van die vooruitgang onder de mensen.

* De Tien Boeien (dasasamyojana, dashasamyojana, ten fetters) die ons tot Samsara beperken zijn achtereenvolgens: 1) het geloof in een aparte ik of zelf, 2) de twijfel ten aanzien van de mogelijkheid om een goed leven te leiden of van het nut ervan, 3) de gehechtheid aan rituelen en ceremonieën, 4) de ingenomenheid met bepaalde dingen, 5) de ingenomenheid tegen bepaalde dingen, 6) de hang naar het aards bestaan, 7) de zucht naar een hiernamaals, 8 ) de zelfgenoegzaamheid of verwaandheid of ijdelheid, 9) de onverdraagzaamheid of prikkelbaarheid of lichtgeraaktheid, en 10) de (laatste resten van onze) fundamentele onwetendheid over de werkelijke aard van het bestaan.

* Nirvana is de staat waarbij de vlam van de levensdorst geheel gedoofd is. Het is het hoogste goed in het boeddhisme. Nirvana en de waarneembare wereld zijn niet twee verschillende werkelijkheden of twee verschillende toestanden van de werkelijkheid. Nirvana is de waarneembare wereld te beleven sub specie aeternitatis, d.w.z. vanuit het gezichtpunt der eeuwigheid. Het is, met andere woorden, de ene werkelijkheid ontdaan van al onze denkbeelden, met inbegrip van deze.

In het Advayavada-boeddhisme houdt Nirvana meer concreet in de opheffing van het lijden door ons volledig te verzoenen met het bestaan zoals het in werkelijkheid is voorbij onze gewoonlijk beperkte en vooringenomen beleving ervan.